Can you capture time in three dimensions?

Nobuhiro NakanishiNobuhiro Nakanishi’s current exhibition at the Kashya Hildebrand gallery is titled Reticulated Time. I looked up ‘reticulated’ in the dictionary; it means ‘constructed, arranged, or marked like a net or network’. I’m not sure whether that’s an accurate description of what these artworks are up to or not, but they certainly take a different approach to representation, using repeated sheets of perspex (I think) to give an impression of a series of impressions, if you see what I mean.  

Nakanishi creates sculptural works that capture and preserve fleeting moments from the natural world in a bid to render tangible the intangible and recreate the tactile sensations produced by our surroundings. They’re suspended moments in time so that a view of a sunrise or a walk through a misty forest become elongated in an attempt to activate our sensory experiences of them: the feel of sunlight on skin, or the smell of mist among the trees.

Nobuhiro Nakanishi

Many of the works are from a series titled Layer Drawing – Light of the Sunrise in which Nakanishi photographs a sunrise from a fixed point of view, rendering the progress of the rays of the sun and the steady movement of clouds through a series of transparent pictorial surfaces. Clouds float slowly across the consecutive plates as an aftereffect of the images and their movements are traced on film.

Nobuhiro Nakanishi

I enjoyed this exhibition very much – I liked the way the plates gradually faded in colour so that if you look at them from opposite ends the effect is quite different.

Nobuhiro Nakanishi

Nobuhiro Nakanishi

And if you look at them close up, you can see the detail that is hidden in the perspective view, of forests and cities and clouds.

Nobuhiro Nakanishi

Nobuhiro Nakanishi

Nobuhiro Nakanishi

Nobuhiro Nakanishi

The exhibition also included drawings from Nakanishi’s Stripe Drawings series, but I thought these suffered from being shown up against the more interesting layered works.

Nobuhiro Nakanishi

There were also some fascinating engraved mirrors, alas, almost impossible to do justice to in a photograph.

Nobuhiro Nakanishi

The exhibition continues until 14 June 2014. The Kashya Hildebrand gallery is on Eastcastle St, a short walk from Oxford Circus and it’s open Monday to Friday from 11 am to 6 pm, Saturdays 12 pm to 6 pm.

Nobuhiro Nakanishi

10 thoughts on “Can you capture time in three dimensions?

  1. Beautiful installations. Don’t you think this work is like a 21st century extension of Eadweard Muybridge’s attempt at capturing motion with photographic stills?

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