Autumn leaves, autumn colours… and murder

Autumn Leaves in Hockley, CanadaAutumn leaf viewing is a big thing in Japan – almost as big as cherry blossom viewing in the spring.  Plus, it has a special significance for me this year because the murder in my new book, The Haiku Murder, happens against the background of golden autumn leaves in Matsuyama, on the island of Shikoku. So I had to do a post on autumn leaves didn’t I? There’s just one thing I have to confess.

Autumn leaves, Toronto

The truth is, these are not pictures of a Japanese autumn. They’re Canadian. I took them two weeks ago in Toronto and in Horseshoe Valley and Hockley, which are about a two hour drive north of Toronto. But maple leaves turn red and gold the world over, so I hope you’ll forgive me for bringing you western leaves, not eastern ones. After all, I do write East-West fusion murder mysteries!

Autumn leaves, Toronto

It was the start of the leaf-peeping season when I was there. Many of the trees were just starting to turn, displaying green, gold and red leaves all at once. I hadn’t realised that the leaves don’t all change colour together; they start on one side of the tree, or at the top, and gradually spread, making for a wonderful spectrum of colour.

Autumn leaves, Toronto

Autumn leaves, Toronto

We did see a few trees which had reached the full crimson stage, like this one which we found on the Mono Adjala Townline outside Hockley.

Autumn leaves, Toronto

Autumn leaves, Toronto

The trees lining the ski slope at Horseshoe Valley were just beginning to turn.

Autumn leaves, Toronto

But some of the best leaves I saw were in the Toronto suburb of Scarborough, right on our own doorstep. Here’s a selection for you.

Autumn leaves, Toronto

Autumn leaves, Toronto

Autumn leaves, Toronto

Autumn leaves, Toronto

The Haiku Murder is available now for Kindle and in paperback on Amazon UK and Amazon USA.

The Haiku Murder

7 thoughts on “Autumn leaves, autumn colours… and murder

  1. Lovely photos!! It’s true that we love the turning of colors but it’s difficult to notice in central Tokyo when exactly it’s happening. One good indication is the gingko trees that turn yellow esp. the ones leading to the “Meiji Memorial Picture Gallery” in Aoyama.

    Like

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