Tadashi’s Kawamata’s staircase at Annely Juda Fine Art

Tadashi KawamataTadashi Kawamata has built a spiral staircase out of scrap and reclaimed wood inside the Annely Juda Gallery. It spans four floors, but counts as fairly small scale compared to some of his other works, in which he’s built massive constructions that attach themselves to the sides of classical buildings like mad wasp nests. It’s an unusual approach, and rather fun.

Tadashi Kawamata

Kawamata often builds over existing urban facades and interiors, creating complicated labyrinths of scaffolding, like a sort of architectural cancer. His aim is to turn conventional environments on their heads, presenting the viewer with a fresh view of their surroundings by defying the rules of logic and symmetry, and the laws of architecture.

Tadashi Kawamata

Tadashi Kawamata

One of the enjoyable aspects of Kawamata’s staircase is how interactive it is; you enter its convoluted spaces, climb up and down it and discover new environments, like the irregular wooden igloo that has spread in all directions on the lower floor.

Tadashi Kawamata

Tadashi Kawamata

Besides the staircase a number of other Kawamata works are on display, all in wood, including his most recent maquettes of tree houses and projects for Ghent.

Tadashi Kawamata

Tadashi Kawamata

Some works consciously echo the favelas of Brazil or the post-tsunami landscape of Tohoku.

Tadashi Kawamata

Tadashi Kawamata

Tadashi Kawamata

I’d recommend a trip to Annely Juda, but you’ll have to hurry to catch the exhibition as it closes on Saturday 21st March. Apologies for not giving you more notice; though my team of highly trained researchers are constantly at work, sometimes they can be a little late in unearthing precious nuggets for your attention. So kudos to Yannick, who came up with this one.

Tadashi Kawamata

Annely Juda Fine Art is on Dering St, just off New Bond St, and is open Monday to Friday 10 am to 6 pm, Saturday 11 am to 5 pm.

6 thoughts on “Tadashi’s Kawamata’s staircase at Annely Juda Fine Art

  1. I really like the look of the irregular igloo. The thing is it must be sturdy, but it just looks like it might fall down. I suppose the glorious haphazard and transient feel is what the artist wishes to convey, but without it actually fall to pieces. No mean feat!

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  2. Absolutely gorgeous, incredible art. I especially love the maquettes of tree houses, but really, the entire project is awesome. To see it live must take your breath away. I wished I could be there! Thanks for sharing.

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    • There were a lot of other wonderful pieces on show as well – I wish I could have included them all in the post but it would have made it impossibly long.

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